Tag Archives: Korean

넌 내게 반했어 001 (00:00:30-00:00:41)

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***Memrise List***

  • 왜 이렇게 늦어?
    왜:
    why
    이렇게: like this, (in) this way  このように、こんなに
    늦다 [늗따] :
    to be late

  • 짐 찾느라 좀 걸렸어요. 
    짐:
    luggage, baggage
    찾다 [찯따]:
    to search, to look for
    좀:
    a little while, a short while
    걸리다:
    to take time

    ⊗~느라(고)  (~のために、~のせいで、~していて)
    = only verbs
    = reason + result (negative)
    = It puts emphasis on the action.
    = You want to say an excuse or reason for the negative outcome.
    She had to search for the luggages. That’s why it took some time to go to the place where her grandfather is.
  • 이거 하나만 좀 들어주시면 안 돼요? 
    들어주다 [드러주다]: to grant (comply with) (a person’s) request⊗~(으)면 안 돼요  (~ではだめですか。) Can’t you…?
    She is carrying lots of luggages so she asks for his help. So she says “Can’t you carry just this one bag?”.들어주시면
    makes the word more polite. 들어주시면 is more polite than 들어주면. It’s similar to 세.
    나가 < 나가요 < 나가세요 < 나가주세요
    들어 < 들어요 < 들으세요 < 들어주세요 (please-)  <  들어주실래요? = 들어주시겠어요?

     

  • 다 늙은 내가 무슨 힘이있다구 날 부려먹으려고 들어?
    늙다 [늑따]:
    to age, to grow old

  • 이거 전부 다 할아버지 짐이잖아요. 
    전부:
    all  全部

    ⊗~잖아(요)  (~じゃないですか?、じゃん?)
    = Verb or noun
    = The listener already knows the fact. The speaker just confirms it. Japanese and Korean people tend to ask for confirmation most of the time.
    But these are all your bags. – The grandfather already knows that they are his bags but still acts like he doesn’t know. So his grandchild reminds him of this fact. 

 

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Learning Korean Through Dramas (넌 내게 반했어 001)

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I chose a Korean drama which I have watched long ago. It’s easy and filled with music so I don’t think there would be much difficulties understanding the lines. But I want to say this. I’m still a beginner in Korean so I’m sure I’ll make lots of mistakes along the way. So if you ever see any mistakes, please be sure to send me a message.

Before we begin, I would like to introduce the colors I’ll be using from now on:
Magenta: Titles, lines
Blue: New Vocabulary
Orange: Japanese
Purple: Korean
Sky blue: New Grammar Point

The title is…

넌 내게 반했어 (Literal translation: You’ve Fallen For Me)

If we were to break it down:

: contraction of 너 and 는
    너: you (informal)
    는: topic marker (It’s just like  in Japanese.)

내게: contraction of 나에게
    나: I (informal)
    에게: to (dative particle)

반했어:
    반하다: to fall in love (with)  [You may not hear the “h” sound when people speak so fast in casual speech. But if they speak slowly, you can clearly hear it. So don’t be surprised if you hear it as “pa-na-da” instead of “pan-ha-da”. And yes, I wrote “b” as “p” because that’s how I hear it. People keep saying that it sounds like something between “b” and “p” when it is in the beginning of the sentence but I mostly hear it as “p”. Wanna know how I say the  (p) sound? I just blow more air and say it abruptly.]

~다 form is the dictionary form. You can think of it as the “-ing” form in English. You need to remove the ~다 part in order to make different verb patterns.
Examples:
가다 (ka-da) to go
먹다 (mok-da) to eat

⇒  JAPANESE: In Japanese, the dictionary forms of the verbs end with the “-u” vowel.
Examples:
行く (i-ku) to go
食べる (tabe-ru) to eat
話す (hana-su) to talk

Let’s go back to our verb and see how it was formed:

반했어

⊗ Present Tense (~ます) (*if you remove , it has to be the verb form that ends with the “-u” vowel.)
RULE: 
1) VERB STEM  or ㅗ  (O) →   VERB STEM아(요)
2) VERB STEM
 or ㅗ  (X)  →   VERB STEM + (요)

Examples:
♥ 가다  (to go) →  Remove 다   →  가
We look at the last syllable of the verb. In this case, there is only one syllable so we’ll look at it. Aha! We see a  there. Just hurry up and add 아(요). It becomes 가아(요). *Irregularity Alert* Think of  as a voiceless letter. When you read , you don’t say nga, right? You read it as “a”. (By the way, I don’t follow the English way of transcription so you won’t see me type “ah” for as I believe it doesn’t reflect the original sound.) So the  in and  want to be together. :O You just stick them together and voila! They became a single . The result: 가(요)

In short: 가다 → 가(요)

♥ 먹다 (to eat) →  Remove 다   →
We look at the last syllable of the verb. In this case, there is only one syllable so we’ll look at it. There is neither nor ㅗ. In this case, the second rule applies. We add (요) and it becomes 먹어(요). 

In short: 먹다 먹어(요)

There are some irregularities but I won’t talk about them right now. I want to focus on the verb 반하다. According to the rule listed above, we could have just removed and look at the last syllable of the verb stem. You see , right? Then it has to be 반하아(요). Unfortunately, that’s not the case here. The verb 반하다 is made up of two parts: 반 + 하다. ( is the hanja version of ) Therefore, we need to apply the present tense version of 하다.

하다 (ha-da) (to do) (する) ⇒ 해(요)

* 요 – You may ask why  is in brackets. That’s because Korean has different kinds of politeness levels. Adding makes the verb more polite but it’s not a high level of politeness. 

You can think of it like this: 
가요行きます
가 – 行く (Not to be confused with the dictionary form. Even though they are the same, Japanese tend to use this form in casual speech. If they want to sound more polite, they used the ~ます form.
)

So, our verb has become like this: 반해요. It still doesn’t look like 반했어 because 반했어 is the simple past form. 😀 Let’s learn how to make the simple past form.

⊗ Simple Past Tense (~ました) (*if you remove , it has to be the verb form that ends with the “-a” vowel.)
RULE: 
VERB STEM  or ㅗ  (O) →   VERB STEM았어(요)
VERB STEM
 or ㅗ  (X)  →   VERB STEM(요)

Examples:
♥ 가다  (to go) →  Remove 다   →  가
We look at the last syllable of the verb. In this case, there is only one syllable so we’ll look at it. Aha! We see a  there. Just hurry up and add 아(요). It becomes 가았어(요). *Irregularity Alert* Think of  as a voiceless letter. When you read , you don’t say nga, right? You read it as “a”. (By the way, I don’t follow the English way of transcription so you won’t see me type “ah” for as I believe it doesn’t reflect the original sound.) So the  in and  want to be together. :O You just stick them together and voila! They became a single . The result: 갔어(요)

In short: 가다 갔어(요)

♥ 먹다 (to eat) →  Remove 다   →
We look at the last syllable of the verb. In this case, there is only one syllable so we’ll look at it. There is neither nor ㅗ. In this case, the second rule applies. We add (요) and it becomes 먹었어(요). 

In short: 먹다 먹었어(요)

반하다 ⇒ [하다 becomes 했어] ⇒ 반했어

You can think of it like this: 
갔어요行きました
갔어 – 行った (Japanese tend to use this form in casual speech. If they want to sound more polite, they used the ~ました form.
)

Phew. I didn’t think breaking down a sentence would take this long. But I hope you were able to understand some parts of it. ^^” My other posts may not be this long but I’ll try to explain important points whenever I can.

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